yup

yup

(via kakalotl)

fuckyeahmyvagina:

morghan-watson:

This is the single most important thing I have ever posted. This girl, Aysia Larissa Peters, as shown above recently had her life tragically cut short in an act of domestic violence. Her aunt, Cory Bennett, made this post on facebook in hopes of raising some awareness around this serious issue. Please take the time to read and share this, it is important:
"This is my niece. Aysia Larissa Peters. I know I needn’t state the obvious, but I will. She is absolutely gorgeous. As with all things true beauty lies within; and she is truly beautiful. She is compassionate, kind, creative and a true friend. I know this not because I am her biased aunt. I know this because this is what I have been reading about her. These are the words of her friends and family, these are their words of tribute and reflection, their words of goodbye. As you read that word “goodbye”, what did you think? Did you think “how awful, what a loss, what a shame, what happened?” I know I would have. Human nature is to then try and come to some manner of obvious conclusion. “Not another child lost to… drinking and driving, drugs, texting and driving, suicide, cancer…” Those are the obvious choices. They are all plagues on our society, all thieves of youth. Did any of you think, “not another victim of domestic violence?” Was that anyone’s first thought? When the call came it was mine.
Look at her face. She is every girl. Who do you see? I see Porsche and Robin, Samantha and Jess, Karley and, and, and, and. 
It’s so odd how you can find yourself forgetting how to breathe. 
As with all things the story unfolds. Moved away from home, dropped out of school, alienated from family and friends, made to feel worthless by her boyfriend? Partner? What do I call this vile stain on the fabric of society? How can someone I have never known change my life so much? Recently she went home. She left with the clothes on her back and with the tenacity that was Aysia. She walked 17 kilometres, to her daddy who could barely recognize her. “She wasn’t eating.” She was disappearing in more ways than one. She showered, put on the new clothes that he had run out to buy her, played with the new puppy he had gotten for her when she was away, for when she would come home. Slept in her bed in the room that had been untouched for months; waiting for her. A room that had been a constant reminder that she was not there, was now once again sanctuary. She felt like “such a loser”, “couldn’t even graduate high school”. No amount of reassurance seemed to change this. No matter, she was home. She was where she was safe and loved. After a time her resolve waivered. She went back. 
The story I have thus far is that he shot her in the head. She languished for a few hours and while her parents were trying to make the very difficult decision as to whether or not to gift the organs of their daughter to those in need her heart stopped and there was no more decision to be made. 
he
shot
her 
in 
the 
head
Much of it is sadly not surprising. A predictable pattern of events occurs with an obvious conclusion; except. Except she’s 17. 
I have attended many a take back the night march; December 6th memorials for the women of the Montreal massacre; memorials for women who were victims of domestic violence, for women I did not know and never will. It happens to other people. It happens to women who at the very least have a 2 as the first digit in their age. It is what you read in the paper or see on the news but it does not happen to my family. This does not happen to us. 
And yet here we are.
My friends are asking me what can I do? How can I help? What do I say? How do I say it? What do you need?
Funny, those are the things I have been asking myself for months while we waited. Waited with arms not long enough to reach her; waited with words spoken but unheard, waited for texts and messages to be returned, waited with dread for the call to come. The call that finally did.
This is not really a conversation that we are having all that often. We are seeing it on occasion. I know it’s been Oprahed and Dr. Philed. But it is not real. 
He shot her in the head. It is real.
So here is my answer. Please share this with your Facebook friends. Please have this conversation with your children. Listen to what they have to say while your arms are long enough to hold them and you are close enough to hear. I know this isn’t the sort of thing we want to think about or pass on but it is what will help. If ever I helped you please help my family now. If you receive this from a friend of a friend of a friend please pass it along you don’t know who is listening for a voice that says you are not alone and if you ask for help it will be given. 
Just ask. 
It is not love when he is jealous it is a belief that he owns you. He should want you to have friends and spend time with your family; if he does not he is trying to isolate you, to take you away from the loving influences in your life that will do their best to shield you from him. If he makes you feel stupid or ugly or useless that is not what people who love you do. People who love you make you feel wonderful and supported always; their love is not a lure. If he swears at you, calls you names, yells at you or demeans you he does not love you. If he cannot live without you then it is likely you won’t.
I know many will want justice for Aysia. There will be no justice. This cannot be fixed and no matter what happens to him it will not reassemble the chards of my broken heart.
And while this will sound very cliché to some if this message saves ONE young woman, girl, child (what do I call her), then at the very least her loss will have meaning. If my niece died so that others may live that will be something. She would have wanted that, to help someone else, even if she could not help herself.
Goodbye sweet girl.”

This is powerful. In May 2014, a close friend of mine was also shot in the head and killed by her scum bag “boyfriend”. She was in her early 20’s. When I was 18, my now ex-husband beat me to an inch of death. Then he kept on beating me. I was always covered in bruises, I had to start coming up with clever excuses, I was so ashamed that I had become this thing I had said I would never be, but I couldn’t see a way out. By the time I was 20, he had broken my ribs and my nose and, final straw, after beating me mercilessly because I had tried to leave him, held a gun in my mouth while he raped me in an ally where he had caught up to me while I was trying to run away from him, blind (I had been sleeping when it all started and I wear contacts), bleeding from him, and naked from him ripping my pajamas off, I ran hysterical through the streets of Venice, CA and pounded on a strangers door to help me. They took me and helped me more than I could’ve expected. I was lucky for the kindness of strangers. That week, I left most of my belongings behind, along with my home and all my friends, and moved to Oregon, where my sister was living. Ten years ago, almost. I was lucky to get out alive. Bianca, my friend who was killed in May, and this sweet child weren’t as lucky to escape. I don’t usually tell people about what happened in my past, it still is so traumatizing. I’m sharing this because I think it’s important to realize that this could be anyone. Even me, this strong feminist, independent woman. Domestic Abuse sucks us in and we are beat down and lost. If it weren’t for those kind strangers that night, I wouldn’t be here today. What we do to help others matters. Spread this powerful message. Pay attention. Help. Don’t give up on your friends who show up with bruises time and time again, telling you they “fell” even though you know better. It was a web of people who saved my life. I wish I could’ve helped to save Bianca and Aysia. Rest in peace. Too many sweet women stolen by Domestic Violence. It’s heart breaking. Let’s be each other’s safety net. Don’t turn away just because it’s hard to look, or because you don’t know how to help. Ask questions. Don’t judge. Make yourself available. Be gentle with battered women, verbally and otherwise, they are shaken and hyper sensitive. You could be the one to help save someone’s life. I’m a survivor, and though I walked away alone, I couldn’t have done it without help.

fuckyeahmyvagina:

morghan-watson:

This is the single most important thing I have ever posted. This girl, Aysia Larissa Peters, as shown above recently had her life tragically cut short in an act of domestic violence. Her aunt, Cory Bennett, made this post on facebook in hopes of raising some awareness around this serious issue. Please take the time to read and share this, it is important:

"This is my niece. Aysia Larissa Peters. I know I needn’t state the obvious, but I will. She is absolutely gorgeous. As with all things true beauty lies within; and she is truly beautiful. She is compassionate, kind, creative and a true friend. I know this not because I am her biased aunt. I know this because this is what I have been reading about her. These are the words of her friends and family, these are their words of tribute and reflection, their words of goodbye. As you read that word “goodbye”, what did you think? Did you think “how awful, what a loss, what a shame, what happened?” I know I would have. Human nature is to then try and come to some manner of obvious conclusion. “Not another child lost to… drinking and driving, drugs, texting and driving, suicide, cancer…” Those are the obvious choices. They are all plagues on our society, all thieves of youth. Did any of you think, “not another victim of domestic violence?” Was that anyone’s first thought? When the call came it was mine.

Look at her face. She is every girl. Who do you see? I see Porsche and Robin, Samantha and Jess, Karley and, and, and, and. 

It’s so odd how you can find yourself forgetting how to breathe. 

As with all things the story unfolds. Moved away from home, dropped out of school, alienated from family and friends, made to feel worthless by her boyfriend? Partner? What do I call this vile stain on the fabric of society? How can someone I have never known change my life so much? Recently she went home. She left with the clothes on her back and with the tenacity that was Aysia. She walked 17 kilometres, to her daddy who could barely recognize her. “She wasn’t eating.” She was disappearing in more ways than one. She showered, put on the new clothes that he had run out to buy her, played with the new puppy he had gotten for her when she was away, for when she would come home. Slept in her bed in the room that had been untouched for months; waiting for her. A room that had been a constant reminder that she was not there, was now once again sanctuary. She felt like “such a loser”, “couldn’t even graduate high school”. No amount of reassurance seemed to change this. No matter, she was home. She was where she was safe and loved. After a time her resolve waivered. She went back. 

The story I have thus far is that he shot her in the head. She languished for a few hours and while her parents were trying to make the very difficult decision as to whether or not to gift the organs of their daughter to those in need her heart stopped and there was no more decision to be made. 

he

shot

her 

in 

the 

head

Much of it is sadly not surprising. A predictable pattern of events occurs with an obvious conclusion; except. Except she’s 17. 

I have attended many a take back the night march; December 6th memorials for the women of the Montreal massacre; memorials for women who were victims of domestic violence, for women I did not know and never will. It happens to other people. It happens to women who at the very least have a 2 as the first digit in their age. It is what you read in the paper or see on the news but it does not happen to my family. This does not happen to us. 

And yet here we are.

My friends are asking me what can I do? How can I help? What do I say? How do I say it? What do you need?

Funny, those are the things I have been asking myself for months while we waited. Waited with arms not long enough to reach her; waited with words spoken but unheard, waited for texts and messages to be returned, waited with dread for the call to come. The call that finally did.

This is not really a conversation that we are having all that often. We are seeing it on occasion. I know it’s been Oprahed and Dr. Philed. But it is not real. 

He shot her in the head. It is real.

So here is my answer. Please share this with your Facebook friends. Please have this conversation with your children. Listen to what they have to say while your arms are long enough to hold them and you are close enough to hear. I know this isn’t the sort of thing we want to think about or pass on but it is what will help. If ever I helped you please help my family now. If you receive this from a friend of a friend of a friend please pass it along you don’t know who is listening for a voice that says you are not alone and if you ask for help it will be given. 

Just ask. 

It is not love when he is jealous it is a belief that he owns you. He should want you to have friends and spend time with your family; if he does not he is trying to isolate you, to take you away from the loving influences in your life that will do their best to shield you from him. If he makes you feel stupid or ugly or useless that is not what people who love you do. People who love you make you feel wonderful and supported always; their love is not a lure. If he swears at you, calls you names, yells at you or demeans you he does not love you. If he cannot live without you then it is likely you won’t.

I know many will want justice for Aysia. There will be no justice. This cannot be fixed and no matter what happens to him it will not reassemble the chards of my broken heart.

And while this will sound very cliché to some if this message saves ONE young woman, girl, child (what do I call her), then at the very least her loss will have meaning. If my niece died so that others may live that will be something. She would have wanted that, to help someone else, even if she could not help herself.

Goodbye sweet girl.”

This is powerful. In May 2014, a close friend of mine was also shot in the head and killed by her scum bag “boyfriend”. She was in her early 20’s. When I was 18, my now ex-husband beat me to an inch of death. Then he kept on beating me. I was always covered in bruises, I had to start coming up with clever excuses, I was so ashamed that I had become this thing I had said I would never be, but I couldn’t see a way out. By the time I was 20, he had broken my ribs and my nose and, final straw, after beating me mercilessly because I had tried to leave him, held a gun in my mouth while he raped me in an ally where he had caught up to me while I was trying to run away from him, blind (I had been sleeping when it all started and I wear contacts), bleeding from him, and naked from him ripping my pajamas off, I ran hysterical through the streets of Venice, CA and pounded on a strangers door to help me. They took me and helped me more than I could’ve expected. I was lucky for the kindness of strangers. That week, I left most of my belongings behind, along with my home and all my friends, and moved to Oregon, where my sister was living. Ten years ago, almost. I was lucky to get out alive. Bianca, my friend who was killed in May, and this sweet child weren’t as lucky to escape. I don’t usually tell people about what happened in my past, it still is so traumatizing. I’m sharing this because I think it’s important to realize that this could be anyone. Even me, this strong feminist, independent woman. Domestic Abuse sucks us in and we are beat down and lost. If it weren’t for those kind strangers that night, I wouldn’t be here today. What we do to help others matters. Spread this powerful message. Pay attention. Help. Don’t give up on your friends who show up with bruises time and time again, telling you they “fell” even though you know better. It was a web of people who saved my life. I wish I could’ve helped to save Bianca and Aysia. Rest in peace. Too many sweet women stolen by Domestic Violence. It’s heart breaking. Let’s be each other’s safety net. Don’t turn away just because it’s hard to look, or because you don’t know how to help. Ask questions. Don’t judge. Make yourself available. Be gentle with battered women, verbally and otherwise, they are shaken and hyper sensitive. You could be the one to help save someone’s life. I’m a survivor, and though I walked away alone, I couldn’t have done it without help.

amaeza:

untruc:

amaeza:

you know, i’m a raging lesbian and i was never distracted by what other girls in my classes were wearing in high school. this is a male problem, not an “attracted to women” problem.

This is an “inability to respect women” problem.

Which is a male problem.

(via igiiwan)

misandry-mermaid:

clehmentine:

rhube:

supercargautier:

manifestingwomanist:

bushtitfeminist:

jadelyn:

enterprisingly:

This is the same man.

This works quite nicely at debunking the “beefcake guys in comics are objectified for women just like women in comics are for men!” imo.  On the left: a magazine tailored for a male audience, showing him in full beefcake-type mode with headlines about how you, too, can look like this.  On the right: a magazine tailored for a female audience, which has a headline about romance and shows him looking more or less like a normal dude.

Tell me again how comic book guys are designed for female sexual enjoyment, completely equivalent to anatomically-improbable spines and giant tits with their own individual centers of gravity, and totes aren’t just male power fantasies.

COMMENTARY

Women don’t treat men the way men treat women.

it’s also worth noting that despite all the geeks complaining about women’s impossible standards, the fantasy on the right sets a really really easy low bar to meet:

"cool clean friendly non-aggressive man who will cook a food for u"

yep what an unfair standard to be subjected to

"cool clean friendly non-aggressive man who will cook a food for u"

Yup, that would do it.

I LOVE EVERY SINGLE THING ABOUT THIS POST OH DEAR LORD <3

Left-picture Hugh Jackman is what happens when dudes want to look at other dudes with their male gaze goggles on.

(via igiiwan)

tw-americanhistory:

The American Bison Massacre — All for coats.

The building of continental railways in both Canada and the United States provided easy access for anyone who wanted to shoot bison. Shooting a bison from the window or roof of the new trains became great sport. Commercial hunters killed the animals primarily for their hides, used to make highly coveted buffalo coats. In a three year period, starting in 1872, hide hunters killed eight million bison. They left behind carcasses that slowly decayed into piles of bison bones, making the prairie so white some said it looked as if it were covered in snow even in summertime. The bones were shipped back east in large quantities for the making of glue, bone meal, buttons and tools.

In the United States, the decimation of the bison was part of a deliberate, and successful, effort to starve the Plains Indians into submission. Two years later, Congress was advised that bison hunters had done more to settle what they called “the vexed Indian question” than the entire U.S. army. The politicians were urged to continue to support the hunters. “For the sake of lasting peace, let them kill, skin and sell until the bison are exterminated.”

The Canadian government didn’t go after the bison quite so vigorously. But commercial over-hunting to supply the fur trade achieved much the same result. In both countries, the demise of an animal that had dominated the landscape for so long proved astonishingly swift – by 1890, only a few hundred head remained. You really have to wonder how governments could allow the extermination of some 100 million Bison to ever happen! The American’s had motive to solve their so called Indian problem but the Canadian’s had to be driven by pure greed.

read more at http://myrockymountainwindow.com/2012/02/27/the-bison-massacre-all-for-coats/

(via jlembcke1997)

kemetic-dreams:

Genocide and Denying It: Why We Are Not Taught that the Natives of the United States and Canada were Exterminated

Death Toll: 95,000,000 to 114,000,000

American Holocaust: D. Stannard (Oxford Press, 1992) - “over 100 million killed” “[Christopher] Columbus personally murdered half a million Natives”

“Hitler’s concept of concentration camps as well as the practicality of genocide owed much, so he claimed, to his studies of English and United States history. He admired the camps for Boer prisoners in South Africa and for the Indians in the wild west; and often praised to his inner circle the efficiency of America’s extermination – by starvation and uneven combat – of the red savages who could not be tamed by captivity.”

– P. 202, “Adolph Hitler” by John Toland

Native Americans have the highest mortality rate of any U.S. minority because of U.S. action and policy. The biggest killers though were smallpox, measles, influenza, whooping cough, diphtheria, typhus, bubonic plague, cholera, and scarlet fever. All imported by the Europeans colonists.
GENOCIDE OF NATIVE AMERICANS: A SOCIOLOGICAL VIEW

The term Genocide derives from the Latin (genos=race, tribe; cide=killing) and means literally the killing or murder of an entire tribe or people. The Oxford English Dictionary defines genocide as “the deliberate and systematic extermination of an ethnic or national group” and cites the first usage of the term as R. Lemkin, Axis Rule in Occupied Europe, (1944) p.79. “By ‘genocide’ we mean the destruction of a nation or an ethnic group.”

The U.N. General Assembly adopted this term and defended it in 1946 as “….a denial of the right of existence of entire human groups.” Most people tend to associate genocide with wholesale slaughter of a specific people. However, “the 1994 U.N. Convention on the Punishment and Prevention of the Crime of Genocide, describes genocide beyond outright murder of people as the destruction and extermination of culture.” Article II of the convention lists five categories of activity as genocidal when directed against a specific “national, ethnic, racial, or religious group.”

These categories are:

Killing members of the group;
Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of group;
Deliberately infliction on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.
Genocide or the deliberate extermination of one ethnic group by another is not new, for example in 1937 the Pequot Indians were exterminated by the Colonists when they burned their villages in Mystic, Connecticut, and then shot all the other people — including women and children — who tried to escape. The United States Government has refused to ratify the U.N. convention on genocide. There are many facets of genocide which have been implemented upon indigenous peoples of North America. The list of American genocidal policies includes: Mass-execution, Biological warfare, Forced Removal from homelands, Incarceration, Indoctrination of non-indigenous values, forced surgical sterilization of native women, Prevention of religious practices, just to name a few.

By mass-execution prior to the arrival of Columbus the land defined as the 48 contiguous states of America numbered in excess of 12 million. Four centuries later, it had been reduced by 95% (237 thousand). How? When Columbus returned in 1493 he brought a force of 17 ships. He began to implement slavery and mass-extermination of the Taino population of the Caribbean. Within three years five million were dead. Fifty years later the Spanish census recorded only 200 living! Las Casas, the primary historian of the Columbian era, writes of numerous accounts of the horrendous acts that the Spanish colonists inflicted upon the indigenous people, which included hanging them en masse, roasting them on spits, hacking their children into pieces to be used as dog food, and the list continues.

This did not end with Columbus’ departure, the European colonies and the newly declared United States continued similar conquests. Massacres occurred across the land such as the Wounded Knee Massacre. Not only was the method of massacre used, other methods for “Indian Removal” and “clearing” included military slaughter of tribal villages, bounties on native scalps, and biological warfare. British agents intentionally gave Tribes blankets that were intentionally contaminated with smallpox. Over 100 thousand died among the Mingo, Delaware, Shawnee and other Ohio River nations. The U.S. army followed suit and used the same method on the Plains tribal populations with similar success.

FORCED REMOVAL FROM HOMELANDS

For a brief periods after the American Revolution, the United States adopted a policy toward American Indians known as the “conquest” theory. In the Treaty of Fort Stansix of 1784, the Iroquois had to cede lands in western New York and Pennsylvania. Those Iroquois living in the United States (many had gone to Canada where the English gave them refuge) rapidly degenerated as a nation during the last decades of the eighteenth century, losing most of their remaining lands and much of their ability to cope. The Shawnees, Miamis, Delawaresm, Ottawans, Wyandots, and Potawatomis watching the decline of the Iroquois formed their own confederacy and informed the United states that the Ohio river was the boundary between their lands and those of the settlers. It was just a matter of time before further hostilities ensued.

FORCED ASSIMILATION

The Europeans saw themselves as the superior culture bringing civilization to an inferior culture. The colonial world view split reality into popular parts: good and evil, body and spirit, man and nature, head and hear, European and primitive. American Indians spirituality lacks these dualism’s; language expresses the oneness of all things. God is not the transcendent Father but the Mother Earth, the Corn Mother, the Great Spirit who nourishes all It is polytheistic, believing in many gods and many levels of deity. “At the basis of most American Native beliefs is the supernatural was a profound conviction that an invisible force, a powerful spirit, permeated the entire universe and ordered the cycles of birth and death for all living things.” Beyond this belief in a universal spirit, most American Indians attached supernatural qualities to animals, heavenly bodies, the seasons, dead ancestors, the elements, and geologic formations. Their world was infused with the divine – The Sacred Hoop. This was not at all a personal being presiding ominpotently over the salvation or damnation of individual people as the Europeans believed.

For the Europeans such beliefs were pagan. Thus, the conquest was rationalized as a necessary evil that would bestow upon the heathen “Indians” a moral consciousness that would redeem their amorality. The world view which converted bare economic self interest into noble, even moral, motives was a notion of Christianity as the one redemptive religion which demands fealty from all cultures. In this remaking of the American Indians the impetus which drove the conquistador’s invading wars not exploration, but the drive to expand an empire, not discovery of new land, but the drive to accumulate treasure, land and cheap labor.

CULTURE

Culture is the expression of a people’s creativity — everything they make which is distinctively theirs: language, music, art, religion, healing, agriculture, cooking style, the institutions governing social life. To suppress culture is to aim a cannonball at the people’s heart and spirit. Such a conquest is more accomplished than a massacre. “We have seen the colonization materially kills the colonized. It must be added that it kills him spiritually. Colonization distorts relationships, destroys and petrifies institutions, and corrupts….both colonizers and the colonized.”

Strategies of targeting American Indian children for assimilation began with violence. Forts were erected by Jesuits, in which indigenous youths were incarcerated, indoctrinated with non-indigenous Christian values, and forced into manual labor. Schooling provided a crucial tool in changing not only the language but the culture of impressionable young people. In boarding schools students could be immersed in a 24 hours bath of assimilation. “The founder of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania , Capt. Richard H. Pratt, observed in 1892 that Carlisle has always planted treason to the tribe and loyalty to the nation at large. More crudely put, the Carlisle philosophy was, “Kill the Indian to save the man.” At the boarding schools children were forbidden to speak their native languages, forced to shed familiar clothing for uniforms, cut their hair and subjected to harsh discipline. Children who had seldom heard an unkind word spoken to them were all too often verbally and physically abused by their white teachers. In short, “there was a full-scale attempt at deracination — the uprooting or destruction of a race and its culture.” A few American Indian children were able to run away, others died of illness and some died of homesickness.

The children, forcibly separated from their parents by soldiers often never saw their families until later in their adulthood, after their value-system and knowledge had been supplanted with colonial thinking. When these children returned from boarding schools they no longer knew their native language, they were strangers in their own world, there was a loss, a void of not belonging in the native world, nor the white man’s world. In the movie “Lakota Women,” these children are referred to as “Apple Children [red on the outside, white on the inside]” they do not know where they fit in, they were unable to assimilate into either culture. This confusion and loss of cultural identity, leads to suicide, drinking and violence. The most destructive aspect of alienation is the loss of power, of control over one’s destiny, over one’s memories, through relationships — past and future.

Jose Noriega’s well-documented historical account of the forced indoctrination of colonial thought into the minds of American Indian children as a means of disrupting the generational transmission of cultural values, clearly demonstrates the cultural genocide employed by the U.S. government as a means of separating the American Indians from their land.

FORCED REMOVAL

The “Indian Removal” policy was implemented to “clear” land for white settlers. Removal was more than another assault on American Indians’ land titles. Insatiable greed for land remained a primary consideration, but many people now believed that the removal was the only way of saving American Indians from extermination. As long as the American Indians lived in close proximity to non-Native American communities, they would be decimated by disease, alcohol, and poverty. The Indian Removal Act began in 1830. Forced marches at bayonet-point to relocation settlements resulted in high mortality rates. The infamous removal of the Five Civilized Tribes — the Choctaws, Creeks, Chickasaws, Cherokees, and Seminoles — is a dismal page in United States history. By the 1820′s the Cherokees, who had established a written constitution modeled after the United States Constitution, a newspaper, schools, and industries in their settlements, resisted removal. In 1938 the federal troops evicted the Cherokees. Approximately four thousand Cherokees died during the removal process because of poor planning by the United States Government. This exodus to Indian Territory is known as the Trail of Tears. More than one hundred thousand American Indians eventually crossed the Mississippi River under the authority of the Indian Removal Act.

STERILIZATION

Article II of United Nations General Assembly resolution, 1946: In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial, or religious group, as such: (d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group. In the mid-1970s a Choctaw-Tsalagi Indian Health Services doctor was approached by a 26-year-old American Indian woman who desired a “wonb transplant.” She had been sterilized when she was 20 at the Indian Health Service hospital in Claremont, Oklahoma. It was discoverd that 75 percent of the Claremont sterilizations were non-therapeutic, that women American Indians were being prompted to sign sterilization forms they didn’t understand, that they were being told the operations were reversible, and that some women were even being asked to sign sterilization papers while they had yet to come out of birthing sedation.

Common Sense magazine reported that the Indian Health Service “was sterilizing 3,000 Indian women per year, 4 to 6 percent of the child bearing population…Dr. R. T. Ravenholt, [then] director of the federal government’s Office of Population, later confirmed that ‘surgical sterilization has become increasingly important in recent years as one of the advanced methods of fertility management’.” Ravenholt’s response to these inquires “told the population Association of America in St. Louis that the critics were ‘a really radical extremist group lashing out at a responsible program so that revolution would occur’.”

From the beginning of European control there has been an unrelenting drive to commit genocide over another culture. The American Indians were a majority so the Europeans called them an enemy. One of the major facts the United States Government has failed to understand is that the spiritual aspect of life is inseparable from the economic and the political aspects. The loss of tradition and memory will be the loss of positive sense of self. Those reared in traditional American Native societies are inclined to relate events and experiences to one another, they do not organize perceptions or external events in terms of dualities or priorities. This egalitarianism is reflected in the structure of American Indian literature, which does not rely on conflict, crises, and resolution for organization.

INTELLECTUAL RICHES

American Indians felt comfortable with the environment, close to the moods and rhythms of nature, in time with the living planet. Europeans were quite different, viewing the earth itself as lifeless and inorganic, subject to any kind of manipulation or alteration. Europeans tended to be alienated from nature and came to the New World to use the wilderness, to conquer and exploit its natural wealth for private gain.

But for American Indians, the environment was sacred, possessing a cosmic significance equal to its material riches. The earth was sacred — a haven for all forms of life — and it had to be protected, nourished, and even worshipped. Chief Smoholla of the Wanapun tribe illustrated American Native reverence for the earth when he said in 1885:

“God said he was the father of and earth was the mankind; that nature was the law; that the animals, and fish and plants beyond nature, and that man only was sinful.

You ask me to plow the ground! Shall I take a knife and tear my mother’s bosom?

Then when I die she will not take me to her bosom to rest.

You ask me to dig for stone! Shall I dig under her skin for her bones?

Then When I die I cannot enter her body to be born again.

You ask me to cut grass And make hay and sell it, and be rich like white men!

But how dare I cut off my mother’s hair?

American Indians’ agricultural and medical wisdom had been ignored by the European invaders. In their rush to control the land and people much has passed them by and much has been destroyed. Sadly, what seems to have been almost totally ignored is the American Indians’ knowledge that the Earth is their mother. Because their mother continues to give us life we must care for and respect her. This was a ecological view of the earth.

“There are tens of millions of people around the world who, within only the last few centuries — and some cases only the last few years — have seen their successful societies brutally assaulted by ugly destructive forces. Some American Indian societies have been obliterated. Some peoples have suffered separation from the source of their survival, wisdom, power, and identity: their lands. Some have fallen from the pressure, compromised, moved to urban landscapes, and disappeared, but millions of American Indians, including tens of thousands here in the United States, have gained strength in the face of all their adversity. Their strength is rooted in the earth and deserves to succeed.”

Books used for references and internet addresses:

Mander, Jerry, In the Absence of the Sacred: The Failure of Technology and the Survival of the Indian Nations,” Sierra Club Books, San Francisco, 1992: 349.
Mankiller, Wilma and Wallis, M., A Chief and Her People, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 1993: 8.
Memi, Albert, The Colonizer and the Colonized, Boston: Beacon Press, 1965: 151.
Olson, James and Wilson, R., Native American, In the Twentieth Century, University Press, 1988, 11.
The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc., Through Indian Eyes, Pleasantville, New York/Montreal, 1995: 338.
Susan Brill, Bradley U. (brill@bradley.edu) Discussion group regarding the genocide of Native peoples.
http://www.igc.apc.org/toxic/
http://conbio.bio.uci.edu/nae/knudsen.html
Federal Indian Policy http://mercury.sfsu.edu.cypher.genocide.html.#children
Trail of Tears http://ngeorgia.com/history/nghisttt.html

(via jlembcke1997)

nonsibilant-fricative:

caelas:

saying feminism is unnecessary because you don’t feel oppressed is like saying fire extinguishers are unnecessary because your house isn’t on fire

while your neighbor’s is

thrashwastedteens:

brucewayneatl:

In case you forgot

Bet they don’t tell you about that in your textbooks…

(via jlembcke1997)

mirandaadria:

I’m so sick of seeing people say “feminism is about *~*equality*~*!!!”

The end goal of feminism is equality, but feminism itself is about liberation: from white supremacy, from homophobia, from sexism, from ableism and all other forms of oppressive thought and behavior.

Without first dismantling the systems that keep us oppressed, equality is impossible.

(via fuckyeahmyvagina)